Goodwood Revival celebrates the 24 Hours of Le Mans Centenary
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Goodwood Revival celebrates the 24 Hours of Le Mans Centenary

After the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elégance and the Monterey Motorsports Reunion in California in August, the Centenary Trophy crossed the Atlantic to the UK where it was presented at Goodwood Revival. This prestigious historic motor race meeting, held every September, is a partner event of the 24 Hours of Le Mans Centenary and was attended by 15 former winners of the French endurance classic. We captured ten moments.

Above, the Centenary Trophy on the starting grid of the Freddie March Trophy race. The field included many cars identical to models that competed in the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Fourteen victors who, between them, amassed 38 wins gathered around the Centenary Trophy. At the front, from left to right: Guy Smith (2003), Benoît Tréluyer (2011, 2012, 2014), Neel Jani (2016), André Lotterer (2011, 2012, 2014) and the Duke of Richmond (Goodwood Revival organiser). Standing behind, from left to right: Marcel Fässler (2011, 2012, 2014), Emanuele Pirro (2000, 2001, 2002, 2006, 2007), Stefan Johansson (1997), Romain Dumas (2010, 2016), David Brabham (2009), Pierre Fillon (ACO President), Tom Kristensen (1997, 2000–2005, 2008, 2013, Centenary Ambassador), Dindo Capello (2003, 2004, 2008), Jochen Mass (1989), Henri Pescarolo (1972, 1973, 1974, 1984), Stéphane Darracq (ACO General Manager) and Richard Attwood (1970). The group includes two complete winning line-ups: Dindo Capello/Tom Kristensen/Guy Smith, who won in a Bentley in 2003, and Marcel Fässler/André Lotterer/Benoit Tréluyer who, together, triumphed three times for Audi.

Five-time winner (1975, 1981, 1982, 1986, 1987) and most successful British driver ever at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, Derek Bell is pictured here at the wheel of a 1964 Ferrari 250 GTO in a parade celebrating the 75th anniversary of the famous Prancing Horse.

The Centenary Trophy and the 75 years of Ferrari – two outstanding anniversaries captured in a single picture. On the left (#14), the Ferrari 250 TR58 in which Belgian Olivier Gendebien and American Phil Hill scored the first of their three Le Mans wins in 1958. The Ferrari bearing the number 20 won twice in succession: in 1963 in the hands of Lorenzo Bandini/Ludovico Scarfiotti, the only all-Italian driver line-up to win Le Mans in a Ferrari, and the following year when driven by Frenchman Jean Guichet, the oldest living former winner, and Sicilian Nino Vaccarella.

Three-time winner Benoît Tréluyer, 24 Hours of Le Mans Museum Director Fabrice Bourrigaud and Pierre Fillon during the grid ceremony for the Freddie March Trophy race, with the Centenary Trophy in the foreground.

Goodwood Revival also attracts a collection of vintage aircraft and Warbirds (Second World War fighter planes) on the airfield at the centre of the racetrack. Here, Henri Pescarolo is pictured with his wife (third and fourth from the left), along with Stéphane Darracq, Pierre Fillon and Fabrice Bourrigaud.

British former track marshal and personality of the 24 Hours of Le Mans, Steve Tarrant (left) is joined beside the Centenary Trophy by the Italian five-time winner Emanuele Pirro.

Pierre Fillon proudly presents the Centenary Trophy that will be handed to the winning drivers on Sunday 11 June 2023, at the end of the 91st 24 Hours of Le Mans, marking the 100th anniversary of the inaugural race run on 26-27 May 1923.

Henri Pescarolo deep in conversation with Pierre Fillon at the wheel of a Ferrari. The appearance record-holder only drove a Ferrari once in 33 Le Mans starts. That was in 1971 when he partnered British racer Michael Parkes in a 512 F for Swiss team Scuderia Filipinetti.

The Centenary Trophy standing in the cosy surroundings of the Goodwood Revival Rolex Drivers Club.

PHOTOS: LOUIS MONNIER / ACO